Notes Of The Restored Latvian Republic: 10 Rubļi (Latvia, 1992)-Article

Updated: Nov 13, 2021

This early post-Soviet Latvian banknote represents the 3rd denomination of the Second Rublis (Series 1992). The Second Rublis banknotes were introduced as a temporary currency. During independent Latvia's efforts to disassociate itself from the Soviet Ruble and the Soviet Union (1922-1991). As the post-Soviet Central Bank of Russia, in which Latvia was dependent. Could not meet the cash and credit demands of Latvia.


As the Second Rublis was intended as a temporary currency. All notes follow relatively basic format, of colorful geometric shapes based on denomination. Similar to the Lithuanian Talonas, the Rublis in theory was equal to the Soviet Ruble. On 18 October 1993, the Second Rublis was replaced by Lats. Although was exchangeable for Lats, until 1 July 1994.


Observe

The observe features a colorful geometric design, in a red-white color scheme. The note's center text declares its "Ten (10) Latvian Rubļi" value, in bold text. Below is a pair of signatures belonging to Bank of Latvia officials. The lower left signature belongs to the "President of the Bank of Latvia". While the lower right signature belongs to the "Chief Treasurer of the Bank of Latvia".


To the the upper left is a small placard. Declaring the note as a "Temporary banknotes of the Bank of Latvia" issued on the year "1992". To the far right is a watermark area, which contains the note's serial number "BK 536529". An additional number "10"s can be seen on the the upper right and lower left corners. Further reinforcing the note's Ten Rubļi value.


Reverse

The reverse features a companion pattern to the observe's art. Notably this pattern is somewhat similar, although duller than the observe. Appearing as a negative design to the observe area. Just as the observe, center text declares the note's "Ten (10) Latvian Rubļi" value. Additional "10"s can be seen on the the upper left and lower right corners.


Additional Notes

  • This note dimensions are 120 x 60 mm or 4.72 x 2.36 in, shorter than a US Dollar.

5 views0 comments